May 202015

3D printing technology is moving into the kitchen. A prototype device developed by Natural Machines allows different types of food to be printed in 3D including chocolate and pasta.

BBC Click’s Melissa Hogenboom finds out more.


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The first 3D food printer kitchen appliance creating fresh savory and sweet dishes. Foodini – changing the way the world prepares food.

Foodini is the first 3D food printer to print all types of real, fresh, nutritious foods, from savory to sweet. Designed for home and professional kitchens, Foodini comes with empty food capsules. You prepare and place fresh, real ingredients in Foodini. No fake food. No being forced to buy pre-filled food capsules. Made with fresh ingredients, this is real food… 3D printed.

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May 202015

3D Systems introduced their ChefJet line of food 3D printers at CES 2014, which will be the first kitchen-ready food printer when it’s released later this year. We learn about how the ChefJet works and what kinds of food and shapes it can make, and then taste test some geometric sugar candy and chocolates created by the printer. Be sure to stick through to the ending!

Sep 172016

Great news for gun owners and enthusiasts that 3D printing technology can now make working guns I am sure Obama is not happy about this. Additive manufacturing or 3D printing[1] is a process of making a three-dimensional solid object of virtually any shape from a digital model. 3D printing is achieved using an additive process, where successive layers of material are laid down in different shapes.
[2] 3D printing is also considered distinct from traditional machining techniques, which mostly rely on the removal of material by methods such as cutting or drilling (subtractive processes).

A materials printer usually performs 3D printing using digital technology. The first working 3D printer was created in 1984 by Chuck Hull of 3D Systems Corp.[3] Since the start of the 21st century there has been a large growth in the sales of these machines, and their price has dropped substantially.[4] According to Wohlers Associates, a consultancy, the market for 3D printers and services was worth .2 billion worldwide in 2012, up 29% from 2011.[5]

The 3D printing technology is used for both prototyping and distributed manufacturing with applications in architecture, construction (AEC), industrial design, automotive, aerospace, military, engineering, civil engineering, dental and medical industries, biotech (human tissue replacement), fashion, footwear, jewelry, eyewear, education, geographic information systems, food, and many other fields. It has been speculated[6] that 3D printing may become a mass market item because open source 3D printing can easily offset their capital costs by enabling consumers to avoid costs associated with purchasing common household objects.[7]
The concept of 3D printing really began to be taken seriously in the 1980s.[8] The man most often credited[citation needed] with inventing the language of ‘modern’ 3D printer is Charles W. Hull, who used the term stereolithography—defined as a “system for generating three-dimensional objects by creating a cross-sectional pattern of the object to be formed”—in a 1984 patent.[9][10]

The term additive manufacturing refers to technologies that create objects through sequential layering.[citation needed] Objects that are manufactured additively can be used anywhere throughout the product life cycle, from pre-production (i.e. rapid prototyping) to full-scale production (i.e. rapid manufacturing), in addition to tooling applications and post-production customization.

In manufacturing, and machining in particular, subtractive methods refers to more traditional methods. The term subtractive manufacturing is a retronym developed in recent years[citation needed] to distinguish it from newer additive manufacturing techniques. Although fabrication has included methods that are essentially “additive” for centuries (such as joining plates, sheets, forgings, and rolled work via riveting, screwing, forge welding, or newer kinds of welding), it did not include the information technology component of model-based definition. Machining (generating exact shapes with high precision) has typically been subtractive, from filing and turning to milling, drilling and grinding.
To perform a print, the machine reads the design from an .stl file and lays down successive layers of liquid, powder, paper or sheet material to build the model from a series of cross sections. These layers, which correspond to the virtual cross sections from the CAD model, are joined or automatically fused to create the final shape. The primary advantage of this technique is its ability to create almost any shape or geometric feature.

Printer resolution describes layer thickness and X-Y resolution in dpi (dots per inch),[citation needed] or micrometers. Typical layer thickness is around 100 micrometers (µm), although some machines such as the Objet Connex series and 3D Systems’ ProJet series can print layers as thin as 16 µm.[11] X-Y resolution is comparable to that of laser printers. The particles (3D dots) are around 50 to 100 µm in diameter.

Construction of a model with contemporary methods can take anywhere from several hours to several days, depending on the method used and the size and complexity of the model. Additive systems can typically reduce this time to a few hours, although it varies widely depending on the type of machine used and the size and number of models being produced simultaneously.

Traditional techniques like injection molding can be less expensive for manufacturing polymer products in high quantities, but additive manufacturing can be faster, more flexible and less expensive when producing relatively small quantities of parts. 3D printers give designers and concept development teams the ability to produce parts and concept models using a desktop size printer.
Though the printer-produced resolution is sufficient for many applications,

ProJet 5000 3D Production Printer

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Sep 172016

The ProJet 5000 is ideal for mass-production of both large and small hard plastic prototypes and end use parts. It enables improved design communication and compressed design-to-manufacturing cycle time providing reduced time to market and higher final product quality.
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